fishing in Killarney

Fishing in Killarney Ireland 

Trout Fishing & Salmon Fishing
trips on the Lakes of Killarney with
Anglers Paradise Fishing Guides
Fly Fishing Trips & Bait Fishing Trips
Rock, Pier, Shore & River Fishing
Day and nightime fishing adventures
Mike (The King) O'Brien
I.F.S.A. Fishing Instructor

Mike O'Brien
Farranfore
Killarney
Co Kerry
Ireland

353 (0)87 1229352
eMail: fishingrod@eircom.net
Eircode V93 A4W5

Trout Fishing and Salmon Fishing in Killarney

  • Fishing in Killarney
 
 
  • brown-trout
  • casting-tuition
  • fly-fishing-loune
  • good-lake-trout
  • lake-fishing
  • lake-trout
  • nice-salmon
brown-trout

Tying salmon and trout flies

The family friend who taught me to fly fish also tied his own flies and he taught me how to tie many famous trout and salmon fly patterns. He had some well proved and still popular fly patterns handed down from his grandfather's time, many of which I still use frequently, conditions permitting. He soon taught me to tie both wet and dry flies. Other fishermen who tied their own flies, also give me some some of their favourite flies. These I often dismantled and put together again just to discover new tying techniques.
Gradually I developed my own system and today I have favourite and well proven flies for all fishing conditions. These flies are always available on fishing trips and can be purchased if the angler wishes to do so.

Rotary Fly Tying Vice

fly-tying-vice

Fly Tying Thread

fly-tying-thread


My first salmon was caught using a Hairy Mary salmon fly. It still has pride of place in my fly box. I tie and stock many of the popular flies on the market from Ireland, England, Scotland, Wales and further afield. I think the fly line is more important than the rod because it is used for casting weight. The lines weights are numbered from 1 to 15. Sometimes the line is required to float and other times it is required to sink. The weight of line I use therefore depends on the conditions, the dept of the water and the position of the fish within the water.
Many different fishing methods are used on both rivers and lakes and I often chose one of my own flies that have been successful in particular waters before. I use a knotless leader and one fly for beginners. I use knotted leaders with several flies when anglers are more experienced.

  • Fishing Trips in Killarney
 
 
  • going-fly-fishing
  • casting-lessons
  • child-at-lake
  • fishing-for-rainbow
  • fishing-for-trout
  • brown-trout-angler
  • friends-fishing
  • lake-fishing
  • fishing-the-loune
  • salmon-fishing
  • trout-anglers
  • spring-salmon
going-fly-fishing

Spinner fishing in Ireland

Spinning is a great introduction to fishing for both the beginner and novice alike. The gear is easy to use, the spool is stationary and it can be adopted to suit left and right handed students. You can distinguish the spinning reel because it is exposed and it both casts and rewinds easily.
Artificial bait is used to resemble wounded or dying fish to attract the hunger and interest of bigger fish.
Lures come in various shapes and sizes and colors and some have blades or spoons at the end that wobble to give the impression of a live fish. I use one lure resembling a small fish with a vague light on its back, it vibrates now and then like a real fish. It can be changed with a mobile phone charger in a few hours and it will last about a day.
Most of the lures have wire running through them and are therefore very suitable for fish like pike which have sharp teeth. The triple hook used in all these lures is very secure and once a fish is hooked, it won’t escape easily.
Plugs also resemble real fish. Some float on the water top, medium plugs further below the surface and heavy plugs in deep water and I use all these plugs in Lough Leane in Lakes of Killarney.

Spinner Wobbler Lures

wobbler-spinning-lure

Spinner Spoon Lures

spinner-spoon-lures


I use dexter wedge, tobies and sprats. I also use meps, bubble and fly and bluehead worms which is best after heavy rain.
When I go to the river, the first thing I look for is the debt and flow of the water and the wind strength and direction. These observations determine what bait and method I use to spin. I keep back a few feet from the river bank to avoid casting shadows of my rod and body on the water and I make as little noise as possible. I usually cast up stream from one to three o clock and I continue to fish clockwise around the pool.
My favorite method is to wind the spinner four times and stop, wind again four times and stop and continue like this to give the feeling of a dying fish. It is important to cast upstream because all salmon and trout face up river allowing the water flow through their gills.

Tying a Teal, Blue and Silver by Dietrich Bohnhorst